IMAGEYENATION


I just kinda realized that it's late Summer already and it's been about a year since I uploaded my last House mix.

I can't lie and say another one's coming soon because I've been incredibly busy with my day job and haven't been copping records like I should.

But I did just stumble on something the other day that made me want to make a mix, the MK remix of "My Head is a Jungle" by German Techno/House producer Wankelmut featuring Australian vocalist Emma Louise.

The remix, courtesy of Detroit House and Pop producer Marc "MK" Kinchen, has that old school flavor that gets you moving on a hot Summer night even through you're already sweating from the heat.

Good thing the video takes place in a laundromat, so you can throw that sweaty shirt in the wash when you're done.

The remix is out Monday, August 18th, on Ultra Records.

Wankelmut
Ultra Records
Posted by El Keter
At 09:04 PM on 08/17/14
Filed under Music



This week's Monday Magick entry comes from one of the most fascinating, and maybe forgotten, singer/songwriters of the so-called Laurel Canyon music scene of the '60s and '70s, occult folky Judee Sill. A former reform school girl and longtime heroin addict with an interest in fringe Christian theology, Rosicrucianism, Pythagorean number theory, psychedelia, and Aleister Crowley, the openly bi-sexual Sill was also a respected singer, songwriter, composer, and arranger who was the first artist to release an album on David Geffen's Asylum Records label.

Her two Asylum LP's, 1971's 'Judee Sill' and 1973's 'Heart Food', are packed with songs like "The Lamb Ran Away With the Crown", which don't mention magick outright but feature cryptic lyrics about astral travel, spiritual warfare, deep catharsis of the soul, religious allegory, and vague occult symbolism. Some tunes, like "The Kiss", and most notably "The Donor", from her self-produced and arranged 'Heart Food' LP, actually have magick (Sill studied the evocative powers of various notes and keys, painstakingly imbuing her songs with spiritual, possibly even angelic, power) woven into the vocal harmonies themselves, which can make her one of the most startlingly affecting singers of all time.

Sadly, Sill was unceremoniously dropped by Geffen after she publicly acknowledged his homosexuality, and she eventually died in poverty, on November 23, 1979, of an apparent drug overdose at the age of 35.

Music is magick.
Posted by El Keter
At 11:22 PM on 08/11/14
Filed under Music



Franco-Cuban twin sisters Naomi and Lisa Kainde-Diaz of Ibeyi return with more downtempo voodoo beats on their new single and video "The River".

The visuals, courtesy of director Ed Morris, are striking, and suit the song, a jittery, thumping, Jazz inflected evocation of the Orisha Oshun, replete with hand drums and Yoruba chants, to a "t".

Check for their debut single the 'Oya EP', featuring "Oya" backed with "The River", which is out now on the XL Recordings label.

Ibeyi
Posted by El Keter
At 10:46 PM on 08/11/14
Filed under Music



Atlanta Rap crew EarthGang call out all the weak ass bullshit the industry and their media puppets in radio and the blogosphere pump to the masses on "The F Bomb".

I don't mind rowdy motherfuckers getting a little ignant, as long as they can rhyme and their shit is dope, both of which apply to these cats right here, but not necessarily to the illiterate bullshit we've been getting spoonfed by the industry of late.

If you're digging EarthGang's style and are a fan of that creative Atlanta spirit embodied by the Dungeon Family and the now defunt indie crew Supreeme, peep their album 'Shallow Graves for Toys'.

EarthGang
Posted by El Keter
At 11:26 PM on 08/05/14
Filed under Music



Armand Hammer, the supergroup comprised of Billy Woods and Elucid, dropped their newest project, an EP titled 'Furtive Movements', today.

As a bit of a reminder, they also slapped the internet in its fucking face with a Billy Woods edited video for the slitheringly funky and blisteringly smart cut "CRWNS".

Seriously, this shit is not for the stupid, or fans of the weak ass shit that the media passes off as "Hip-Hop" most of the time nowadays.

'Furtive Movements' is out now on Backwoodz Studioz.

Armand Hammer
Posted by El Keter
At 11:03 PM on 08/05/14
Filed under Music



I usually don't post videos that aren't actually videos. But we here at Imageyenation are longtime supporters of all things Daptone, and pretty much anything involving a crazy bearded wizard. So, I'm posting this shit.

It's new music from The Budos Band, titled "The Sticks", from their forthcoming album 'Burnt Offering'. It finds the crew tempering their horn-fueled Afro-Funk and hardcore breakbeats with dirty Acid-Rock influenced riffage and some deep deep psychadelia.

You can expect more of the same from 'Burnt Offering' when it drops on October 21st on the Daptone Records label.

The Budos Band
Posted by El Keter
At 11:13 PM on 08/04/14
Filed under Music



This week's Monday Magick entry, the 1973 single "Dancing in the Moonlight" by Franco-American band King Harvest, probably doesn't stand out as being particularly "occult" or "spooky". And while it definitely isn't "spooky", the song's joyous celebration of a group of folks who gather when the moon "gets big and bright" to dance under the night sky in a manner that is both "fine and natural" and "a supernatuiral delight" evokes certain aspects of the rituals of the ancient witch cults. It also brings to mind the spirit of clubbing, but that's a whole other discussion.

The members of King Harvest, with their long hair, beards, and freaky threads sure look like the type of Hippy/Biker cats who might get down with some weird nighttime forest activities. They don't however look like the kind of dudes who would be responsible for one of the smoothest Soft-Rock jams of all time. I guess the power of the beard to make anything cool was particularly strong with these dudes.

Music is magick.
Posted by El Keter
At 10:07 PM on 08/04/14
Filed under Music




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